Eating with the Ecosystem

Eating with the Ecosystem

Eating with the Ecosystem is a small non-profit whose mission is to promote a place-based approach to sustaining New England's wild seafood. Eating with the Ecosystem tends to approach seafood sustainability a bit differently than others. Instead of focusing on a single species and how well that one species is doing, we focus on the entire ecosystem, of which humans are a significant part. Their mission is guided by their 5 Anchors or principles of a place-based approach to sustaining New England's wild seafood.

Sporty Corned Hake

Sporty Corned Hake

Corned hake is an old-timey recipe that many fishing families along the coast of Maine know and love. And like a lot of regional family recipes, everyone has their own tricks and ways of making it. I was introduced to corned hake by my husband and I love the flavor combination of both the traditional recipe, as well as my sportier versions. The corned hake traditional recipe is basically: corned hake, boiled potatoes, bacon or salt pork, fat renderings from the pork, and pickled onions.

The price of seafood

The price of seafood

What can you do: (1) ask where the fish you are buying comes from; if the server at your local dining establishment doesn’t know – ask the manager, if they don’t know – order the steak; (2) ) if you must buy imported seafood; research it - certain farmed shrimp from SE Asia are fed pig feces; AND (3) buy seafood harvested by U.S. fishermen – ideally from your local fishermen’s market or local fishmonger.

Ten reasons why the ten reasons why you don’t eat seafood are all bullshit.

Ten reasons why the ten reasons why you don’t eat seafood are all bullshit.

This is meant to be read with some humor and levity. That being said, I’m not wrong. All of the points made below are based in fact. Seafood is good for you, your mental health, and the environment. Fish is inexpensive and easy to prepare and any of the arguments against these things are ill-advised and do harm, injustice, and a disservice to coastal communities and fishermen.

Lobster? Pfft. More like scallops.

Lobster? Pfft. More like scallops.

Maine waters produce some of the most amazing seafood in the world, and with good reason. The phrase “you are what you eat” applies to seafood too, especially filter feeders. These stationary beauties are at the mercy of Mother Nature when it comes to food: they have to eat what she brings by them. While some shellfish make do with shallow, stagnant waters (ick), Maine bivalves lives the good life: our waters are cold, pure and teeming with tasty critters.

Eating Portland Alive

Eating Portland Alive

Rob started Eating Portland Alive 5-years ago and is up to almost 11k followers. His photos of meals and descriptions of food are enticing and authentic because he spends the time learning and getting to know the staff and chefs in the restaurants. Rather than writing what he thinks his audience wants to hear, Rob writes about his experience and showcases wonderful Maine businesses and foods; it’s authentic and honest, and totally helpful if you’re trying to find a new place to eat.

Chuck Hughes

Chuck Hughes

Turns out, Chuck Hughes took my request for an interview because Maine and because seafood. Turns out, Chuck Hughes visits Maine every summer with his family and has done so since, well, forever, “My parents have been going to Maine since before I was even born.” He even gives these trips to Maine credit for setting him on his path to working in the restaurant business.