Fashion

It’s not that much of a stretch to include fashion on a website dedicated to commercial fishing and the culture and community it inspires. Much like people who have never sat on a tractor wear John Deere sweatshirts, or high school kids who have never picked up a hammer wear Carhartt beanies, there’s a cultural appropriation happening, and people who have never been on a boat are stealing fishermen’s style. The more people who want to dress like a fisherman, the better, because it reminds people of the important role fishermen play in the food system. 

This is my son wearing a vintage Swordfish hat I found at a library sale on Orr’s Island. You can find it for sale in my Etsy shop. (Update: This hat has been SOLD.)

This is my son wearing a vintage Swordfish hat I found at a library sale on Orr’s Island. You can find it for sale in my Etsy shop. (Update: This hat has been SOLD.)

Vintage & Used

I love Goodwill shopping and travelling around hunting for vintage clothing. Not only is it easier on your wallet than ordering brand new stuff online, but it’s also way better for the environment to reuse and recycle old clothing. Fast fashion is a huge contributor to global warming, and the big ships that are crossing the seas to bring cheap shoes to your front door aren’t doing anyone (or any animals) any good either. You can check out my Etsy shop, Rum Riot Vintage, for some amazing stuff. Some of it is vintage and marine-inspired, and some of it is just vintage. You can also find AM shirts there.

Friendly reminder: Eating a diet full of healthy seafood (and less red meat) and wearing used clothing (or quality clothing you don’t have to replace often) both minimize your carbon footprint and are a great way to support fishing families and coastal communities.

artists and makers

Many of the beautiful objects and images from commercial fishing are also inspiring artists and makers to create jewelry, home goods, and even shoes reminiscent of fishing gear. 

I have quite a few things in my closet that are inspired by the fishing industry. From my adorable lobster patterned Alaina Marie Keds to my sweatshirts with Herman’s boat embroidered on the back, to the lobster trap tags I wear as bracelets next to my bracelet that is an actual lobster measure. And in my living room the remote controls sit on top of a coffee table made of lobster trap wire. 

All the makers, posts, images, fishermen, and fashionistas below are helping to elevate style that is inspired by and reminiscent of commercial fishing, or just to stay warm and dry on the water.